Unsecured Wi-Fi Networks: Hackers’ Hot Cakes!

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Every new facet of technology has both boon and bane; your Wi-Fi network is no exception. Your worst nightmare could be staring right on your face if you are not taking actions NOW.

Most hackers are looking for exactly what you have: unsecured Wi-Fi networks! Hacking, though a black-hat technique, is simply an art that miscreants die to how to recover my bitcoin wallet passphrase.

Much to the delight of a professional hacker (I would rather that this is an Oxymoron), a common man easily falls into his trap. But fortunately for the common man, quite pleasantly surprisingly, there is a much easier way out of this predicament. Read on and do not stop short of just being amazed; put them to work. I am giving you exactly 4 techniques.

Technique 1: You do have a Name of your own, don’t you?

SSID is your network identifier. Never leave your default SSID intact; change it as soon as possible by following the below steps.

a. Type http192.168.1.1 (usually)

b. Enter the default ID and password in the main login page (you may Google the default user id and password for virtually all network service providers).

c. Go to Wireless -> Basic

d. Check on the Enable Wireless option e. Change your SSID to something that is difficult for others to guess.

Technique 2: The amazing Wall of Fire that blocks bugs.

If your network supports Firewalls, please make sure that you use it. There are several protocols and it is usually a complicated procedure for a newbie to set up but your service provider would be only glad to help you out. Well, if they are not, you see, it’s a wide world!

Technique 3: You jumble; hackers fumble!

This technique talks about encryption standards; in a way, a sort of jumble.

a. Type http192.168.1.1 (usually)

b. Enter the default ID and password in the main login page (you may Google the default user id and password for virtually all network service providers).

c. Go to Wireless -> Security and select “WPA2-PSK” from the Network Authentication drop-down box.

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